• USD
    • EUR    Euro
    • USD    US Dollar
    • GBP    British Pound
    • CHF    Swiss Franc
    • JPY    Japanese Yen
    • AUD    Australian Dollar
    • CAD    Canadian Dollar
    • NOK    Norwegian Krone
    • PLN    Polish Zloty
    • HKD    Hong Kong Dollar
    • ILS    Israeli New Sheqel
    • SEK    Swedish Krona
    • INR    Indian Rupee
    • SGD    Singapore Dollar
    • MXN    Mexican Peso
    • BRL    Brazilian Real
    • CZK    Czech Koruna
    • ZAR    South African Rand
    • MYR    Malaysian Ringgit
    • DKK    Danish Krone
    • BGN    Bulgarian Lev
    • CNY    Chinese Yuan
    • HRK    Croatian Kuna
    • HUF    Hungarian Forin
    • IDR    Indonesian Rupee
    • KRW    Korean Won
    • NZD    New Zealand Dollar
    • PHP    Philippine Peso
    • RON    Romanian Leu
    • RUB    Russian Ruble
    • THB    Thailand Bath
    • TRY    Turkish Lira
Home » Scuba diving news / articles » Illegal Fishermen Pay a Hefty Price
SCUBA DIVING NEWS / ARTICLES
All articles
ILLEGAL FISHERMEN PAY A HEFTY PRICE

ILLEGAL FISHERMEN PAY A HEFTY PRICE

Photo Credit: Richard Brooks/Pew Charitable Trusts

In the Micronesian nation of Palau, Illegal poachers from Vietnam had 4 of their ships burned in a public spectacle recently. Palau is a shining example for the rest of the world with its fight for marine conservation. In 2009, the Palauan government established the world's first shark sanctuary. Plans to eventually convert the majority of their waters into a marine sanctuary are already being pushed through the legislature. Palau's Rock Islands Southern Lagoon was named a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2012.

In the last year alone, authorities have seized 15 ships full of illegally harvested marine life. The President of Palau, President Tommy Remengesau believes that with such an influx of marine poaching, stripping the boats of their fishing gear and sending them back to their home country just isn't enough. "I think it is necessary to burn the boats," President Remengesau said.

The poaching industry, which accounts for $23.5 billion of the $117.5 billion dollar market for marine products, is difficult to combat. Due to the amount of 'high seas', which make up two-thirds of the world's oceans, poachers often run to these areas to avoid capture. One idea floating around is to create a "geofence", triggering alerts when a vessel crosses into national waters.

Neighboring Indonesia is also taking a tougher stance on poaching. They recently scuttled 41 poaching ships hailing from Vietnam, China, Malaysia, Thailand and the Philippines. Seemingly harsh treatment has been deemed acceptable by the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea.

Other countries are following in Palau's footsteps when it comes to marine conservation. The British plan on making the Pitcairn Islands, home of the descendants of the HMS Bounty, into an 834,000 square kilometer continuous marine reserve, the world's largest. The U.S. government announced last year to expand the protected areas around Johnson Atoll, Wake Atoll, and Jarvis Island. Once expanded, the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument will encompass 1.05 million square kilometers.

SHARE
Author
Docy Good
Author
Docy Good
Docy Good
Switzerland
7 articles published
By the same author
Ocean Acidification
Ocean Acidification
The Effect of Blackfish on Sea World
The Effect of Blackfish on Sea World
Coral Reef in the Maldives
Coral Reef in the Maldives
Street View Oceans
Street View Oceans
Sustainable Seafood
Sustainable Seafood
One week in the Maldives
One week in the Maldives
  • Promote you photos and videos
  • Create or edit dive site info
  • Write dive news and articles
  • Create your public page profile
  • Contact divers and dive centers
Learn more about

LATEST COMMENTS (0)

Name*
Message:

ADD A COMMENT
Name*
Country
Message: